December 2, 2016

Way of Repair

Monastic Tradition
Notes from the Palm: This, in addition to the next few subclasses, items, and other rules, are all inspired by Greater Than Games co-operative card-based board game, Sentinels of the Multiverse. Since we already have plenty of other superhero-analogous classes and subclasses, these should fit right in to any game in that theme.

Way of Repair

In a forgotten corner of a dark and wicked city, there stands a rundown repair shop, ignored by most. On most days, a blind old man wearing simple garments and a belt of tools, waits in the shop for customers and tinkers with his projects, items seemingly broken beyond repair. Despite his calm demeanor and soft-spoken voice, many who encounter the old man can sense that, despite his age and blindness, there is more to him than meets the eye. Some even think the old man is dangerous; they are right.
     In truth, the old man, who responds only to "Slim", was a martial arts master of unparalleled ability. He dedicated his life and skill to the protection of his city, which is plagued by criminals and corrupt lords. His repair shop was once a great school, and he trained a number of capable, powerful warriors. Sadly, his greatest pupil betrayed him, putting out his eyes and joining the ranks of his foes. His spirit broken, the old man shuttered his school for decades, and vowed never to take another student.
     Yet, as the old man began to approach his final years, he found himself ill-content to take his knowledge with him to the grave. He began training new students, hoping that one may surpass his former pupil, and exact the justice upon her that she deserves.

Bonus Proficiencies 
When you choose this tradition at 3rd level, you gain proficiency with the spiked chain and improvised weapons, and can treat them as monk weapons. Additionally, you gain proficiency with tinker's tools and smith's tools.

Stance
At 3rd level, when you select this subclass, you learn to adopt a specialized fighting stance. You can adopt one of the following stances as a bonus action on your turn, and it lasts until you are incapacitated, take a rest, or use a bonus action to switch into a different stance. You can only be in one stance at a time.
  • Alternating Tiger Claw Stance. Damage dealt by your monk weapons or unarmed strikes ignores damage resistance. 
  • Driving Mantis Stance. When you are hit by an attack, you can use your reaction to add your proficiency bonus to your AC, potentially causing the attack to miss. 
  • Grease Monkey Fist Stance. When you take this stance, select a damage type: your unarmed strikes and monk weapons deal that type of damage instead of their normal type. When you make an unarmed strike or an attack with a monk weapon, you can spend a ki point to change the damage type. 
  • Riveting Crane Stance. When you hit a creature with a monk weapon or an unarmed strike, you can spend a point of ki to throw that creature off balance. The next creature other than you who makes an attack against that creature gains advantage on the attack roll.
Tool Fighting Style
At 6th level, you have gained significant skill in fighting with specific monk weapons. Select one of the Tool Fighting Styles listed below. You can use an action to switch to a new tool fighting style.
  • Dual Crowbar Style. While using this fighting style, you can draw or stow two one-handed weapons when you would normally be able to draw or stow only one. When you engage in two-weapon fighting with monk weapons, you gain a +2 bonus to damage rolls. Additionally, you can use Flurry of Blows using a monk weapon you are holding. 
  • Hoist Chain Style. While using this style, you are proficient with the spiked chain and it counts as a monk weapon for you. This spiked chain is a double, finesse, reach, two-handed weapon that deals 1d4 damage on a hit. When you engage in two-weapon fighting with a double weapon, you can act as if you are wielding two weapons, and you can add your ability modifier to the damage of the second roll.
         When you hit a creature with a spiked chain, it has disadvantage on the next attack roll it makes.
  • Jack Handle Style. While wielding a versatile monk weapon, you can use your action to make a melee attack against any number of creatures within 5 feet of you, with a separate attack roll for each target.
  • Pipe Wrench Style. You gain a +1 bonus to AC and damage rolls while you are wielding a monk weapon in one hand and nothing in the other. 
  • Tire Iron Style. Whenever you throw a monk weapon, it immediately returns to your hand, and you can use Flurry of Blows with a throwing monk weapon.
Harmony
At 11th level, you learn to disorient and confuse your foes with your shifting styles and stances. When you change either your Stance or your Tool Fighting Style, you deal an additional +1 damage on all unarmed strikes until the end of your next turn. If you change both your Stance and your Style in the same turn, your unarmed strikes deal an additional 1d6 damage until the end of your next turn instead.

Overdrive
At 17th level, you learn to push yourself beyond what is normally possible. When you use the attack action on your turn, you can spend 7 ki points to take an additional action.



Changelog: 12/5/16: Hoist Chain Style: Spiked chain information added

17 comments:

  1. I have to say the flavor really does feel like Mr Fixer. Based on the relative lack of ki based abilities until level 17 I assume flurrying is the most common use? Also: this has a nice mix of utility and raw damage bonus. I like it.

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    1. Looking again throwing them off balance may be used every turn... So I suppose that could wrack up a cost quickly if fighting in that style.

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    2. That's the intent. In-game, Strike is his only power, so it would make sense that he would use Flurry as often as possible.

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    3. Is it intention that the grease monkey stance lets me pick from all damage typen like fire, acid or necrotic damage? It seems a little to strong against any kind of enemy with elemental weaknesses

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    4. Yes, and that's the point: to give them a way to exploit those weaknesses.

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  2. A very interesting archetype- original and very different from anything else, and uses some concepts which are rare 5e (for example, many static damage bonuses).
    It manages to be combat useful and very thematic, while staying very much balanced (it might seem at first like some of the abilities are very powerful, but overall the class deals only slightly more damage than other monks and lacks some of the non-combat versatility other Ways grant).

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  3. Great class, but my only constructive criticism would be to make Harmony a little more mechanically interesting. If I were to run this class (which I would love to), I'd probably want to change the +1 damage boon for the round into gaining advantage on their single next attack. The full round 1d6 bonus is otherwise pretty good. My only concern with this class is its almost exclusively damage modifiers and AC boosting. I think the extra advantage would be a nice addition

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    1. So, I don't TOTALLY disagree with you, but a large part of this project was building a subclass that felt like playing the character in the card game. In that, the card Harmony boosts your damage dealt by +1 as long as you have a style and a Tool in play. Since you can always have a style and a tool in play here, I built it to encourage regularly swapping between styles.

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    2. That makes sense, and I can see how the extra damage adds up. It's also pretty cool that you are adapting a card game in that manner. There really isn't anything bad about the way you did it, I'd probably let my players choose my alternative suggestion if they felt it would encourage them to switch stances more.

      As it is the +1 damage per hit may only just break even for the alternative bonus action you didn't take in that scenario. Though, that in itself is still quite nice, because it canceling out the cost means you don't have to really weigh the decision to spend an action on switching the stance.

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  4. Doing God's work to make Mr. Fixer viable in at least ONE game. :)

    Looking forward to Naturalist Druid and Ranger Bunker. Actually I'm just now thinking of a ton of fun ways to do this. Time Sorcerer Omnitron-X with Time Ranger... Chronoranger. Warlock Setback? The possibilities seem enticing.

    Good luck with The Sentinels. :P

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    1. Hey, I LIKE Fixer, especially against Kagarra Warfang. He's just SO GOOD at generating crowd favor...

      So the 4 we are doing are this, Legacy as a Fighter Archetype, Nightmist as a Warlock Patron, and Haka as a Barbarian Path. Most other characters can be recreated in one way or another using existing rules or our other subclasses. That said, I'm not opposed to doing other ones in the future: Chrono Ranger as a Ranger Conclave based around bounties sounds kinda fun, and Setback I think would jsut have to be a fighter. He's not really mystical, he just punches things and gets hit a lot.

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  5. I might have missed something, as I tend to, but where are the statistics for the Spiked Chain?

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    1. I...

      Huh. I DID forget to out that in there. It'll be fixed post haste.

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    2. Don't forget that this is totally in the Craftsman

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    3. RIGHT. I knew we had printed that somewhere.

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  6. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle repair, huh?

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