August 28, 2015

Gambler

Roguish Archetype

**The Stupendously Amazing Dan Powell created this. The Hand of Vecna applauds his brilliant creative work.**

Gambler

While any fool can place a bet, Gamblers draw on luck and chance in all aspects of their adventures. Walking testaments to the phrase 'nothing ventured nothing gained,' these daring rogues are willing to risk more than most for the ultimate payoff.
     Despite this ability to seize opportunities that most wouldn't be aware of, Gamblers know that for every roll of the die that lands in their favor, the next could just as easily leave them with nothing. Their abilities consist of random effects that are extremely powerful when successful, but detrimental if unsuccessful.

Bonus Proficiencies
When you choose this archetype at 3rd level, you gain proficiency in the Deception skill as well as all gaming sets.

Lucky Save
Starting at 3rd level, whenever you roll a 20 on a saving throw you can use your reaction to make an attack or move your speed immediately.

Gambler’s Tricks
In your time spent observing the highs and lows that lady luck brings with her, you have mastered certain techniques, known as Tricks, that can tip the odds in your favor, though at the risk of great misfortune.
     At 3rd level, you gain two Tricks of your choice for which you meet the perquisites. Your Trick options are detailed at the end of the class description. You learn an additional Trick at 9th level, 13th level, and 17th level.
     Additionally, when you learn a new Trick in this class, you can replace another Trick that you know with a Trick for which you meet the prerequisites.

Fate’s Fortune
Beginning at 9th level, as an action, you can ask the powers of fate one question about a possible course of action. In your mind you receive guidance as to what the most rewarding course of action is. If you describe courses of action that refer to directions or specific objects, then you become aware of the choice that bears the greatest reward.
     If you describe only a single course of action, fate assumes that inaction is your other option. You will feel a desire to continue (to indicate that you should proceed) or a sense you should halt.
     The feeling can’t assess events in the far future; its judgment extends only to likely events in the next hour. If unable indicate a preference, this feature has no effect and is not expended.
     There are two drawbacks to using the feature to aid your decisions. First, fate values rewards over risk, and provides guidance accordingly. It points you toward a high risk, high reward option before pointing you toward a low risk, low reward alternative.
      Second, fate can choose only the most rewarding course of action relative to the alternatives provided. That doesn’t mean that the indicated choice is necessarily a good idea, only that it’s a better idea than the other options you’ve indicated.
       You regain the use of this feature after finishing a long rest.


Tricks
If a Trick has prerequisites, you must meet them to learn it.

Beginner’s Luck
When you roll an ability check for a skill you are not proficient in, you can gain advantage on that roll. However, you have disadvantage on all future ability checks made using that skill until you finish a long rest.

Borrowed Luck
When you roll a 1 on an attack roll, you can reroll the die and must use the new roll. Alternatively, when a critical hit is scored against you, you can choose to reroll that die and must use the new roll.
     After doing so, the next critical hit you make before a long rest instead counts as a normal hit. You regain use of this feature after a short or long rest.

Breaking Even
     Prerequisite: 9th level
As a bonus action on your turn, choose one creature you can see. For the next minute, whenever you hit the target with an attack you regain hit points equal to your Charisma modifier (minimum of 1). However, whenever you miss the target you take damage equal to the same amount. You regain the use of this feature after finishing a short or long rest.

Chance Dice
You have three chance dice, which are d6s. A chance die is expended when you use it. Before making an attack roll, saving throw, or ability check, you can expend any number of these dice to grant either a bonus or penalty to your roll. If the total number on the chance dice rolled is odd, you must subtract that amount from your d20 roll. If it's even, you must add that amount. You regain all of your expended chance dice when you finish a long rest.

Cheaters Sometimes Prosper
     Prerequisite: 13th level
When you are within 5 feet of a creature that has no other creatures next to it, you can use a bonus action to make a Charisma (Deception) check contested by the target's passive Insight score. If successful, you gain advantage on the next weapon attack roll you make against the target before the start of your next turn.

Counting Cards
     Prerequisite: 9th level
When you score a critical hit with a weapon attack, rather than rolling your weapon damage dice twice, you can instead choose to roll 2d10 in their place (alternatively, with the DM's approval, you could pick 2 playing cards from a deck that has the face cards removed). All other dice, such as sneak attack damage, are rolled twice as per normal.

Double or Nothing
After you hit with a weapon attack, choose odds or evens. If the total number on your damage dice matches your choice you can apply double the damage rolled. However, on an incorrect result your damage is halved (rounded down). You regain the use of this feature after finishing short or long rest.

Even the Odds
When you or a creature you can see within 60 feet makes an attack roll, ability check, or saving throw you can use your reaction to influence the outcome. Roll 1d6, and either add or subtract the result from the triggering roll. You regain the use of this feature after finishing a short or long rest.

Gold Streak
     Prerequisite: 17th level
As an action, you can hurl gold coins at enemies in a 30 foot cone originating from you. Each target must make a Dexterity saving throw with a saving throw equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier. On a failed save, a creature takes 8d10 bludgeoning damage, or half as much on a successful one. Coins created by this ability are solid and convincing, but vanish after 1 hour.
     You regain the use of this feature after finishing a long rest.

High Roller
     Prerequisite: 13th level
When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, but do not score a critical hit, you can try to attempt to turn it into one. Starting with the number shown on the triggering attack roll, choose higher or lower and roll the dice again. If you successfully guess the outcome three times in a row, the original attack becomes a critical hit. You regain the use of this feature after finishing a long rest.

Jinx
You learn and can cast the spell hex without expending a spell slot or spell components. Once you cast it, you must finish a short or long rest before you can cast it again.

Lucky for Some
     Prerequisite: 13th level
As an action, choose a creature you can see within 30 feet to make a Charisma saving throw with a save DC equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier. On a failed save, roll a d20. If the result is odd, the target takes force damage equal to twice the result. If the result is even, it takes force damage equal to half the result.

Lucky Seven
     Prerequisite: 17th level
Your weapon attacks can score a critical hit on a roll of 7 or 20.

Lucky Strike
     Prerequisite: 9th level
When you make a weapon attack, you can choose to make the attack roll with disadvantage. If you do so and the attack hits you can you can roll the weapon’s damage dice an additional two times and add the results to the total damage. You cannot use this ability while also making a Sneak Attack.

Risky Roulette
     Prerequisite: 13th level
When you make an attack roll, you can choose odds or evens. If the attack hits and you guessed the result of the attack roll correctly, the target is stunned until the beginning of your next turn. If you missed and you guessed the result of the attack roll incorrectly, you are incapacitated until the beginning of your next turn. You regain the use of this feature after finishing a short or long rest.

Shared Luck
Whenever you score a critical hit, one friendly creature you can see within 60 feet of you can gain advantage on their next attack roll, skill check or saving throw.

Slots
     Prerequisite: 9th level
Whenever you roll sneak attack damage, if 3 or more of the sneak attack dice have the same result, you can deal additional damage equal to that amount. You can only apply this to 1 trio of results per sneak attack.

Spin the Wheel
     Prerequisite: 9th level
After you hit a creature with a weapon attack, as well as rolling damage normally you can choose to roll a d8 and apply the corresponding effect. You regain the use of this feature after finishing a short or long rest.

d8 Effect
1 You take damage equal to half the damage you dealt to the creature.
2 You are slowed until the end of your next turn and cannot take reactions.
3 You fall prone.
4 No additional effect.
5 You gain advantage on your next attack roll against the target.
6 You deal extra damage to the target equal to your Charisma modifier.
7 You can immediately make another attack against the target with advantage.
8 The target is paralyzed until the beginning of your next turn.

When the Chips Are Down
     Prerequisite: 17th level
When you are reduced to 0 hit points but not killed outright, you can drop to 1 hit point instead. You may also, as a reaction, move up to twice your speed without provoking opportunity attacks. You can’t use this feature again until you finish a long rest.


(I'm actually gonna take a couple more lines down here to talk about how much I love this class and I love Mr. Powell for bringing it to me. Reading this for the first time made my day, and I look forward to any more collaborations Dan brings my way. I seriously can't sing his praises enough.)

17 comments:

  1. It'd be cool if you guys could make a sentient weapon race, or something like that.

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    1. I think he means he wants to be Soul Eater.

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    2. Something along these lines:
      http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?400609-3-5-quot-Look-whatever-you-re-thinking-do-me-a-favor-don-t-let-go-quot

      It's an old concept in 3.5 of playing an intelligent object.

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  2. I'm just wondering if you guys are aware that a only a nat 20 is a auto hit. This regarding the lucky seven ability as it is written it is fine but I was wondering if that was the intention cuz a lot of people still get confused on the ruling

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    1. That is the intention, yes. On a nat 20 or nat 7, you crit.

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    2. Yes that's right a 7 would indeed be both an automatic hit and a critical hit, we toyed with wording it differently but it seemed that this was consistent with the Champion fighter for example. The result is certainly an increase in the likelihood of a hit by a high degree, but for a 17th level feature this seemed balanced and had a nice and unusual flavour.

      (Sorry my deleted post had spelling errors I couldn't live with).

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    3. Oh wow I miss read that then, I don't have my phb inform of me bit I do belive that in the combat chapter it says only a nat 20 is an auto hit and a critical hit. If I recall correctly the champion fighter only gives you a critical hit not an auto hit on a 19. But I could be wrong. Btw love the class to bits.

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    4. You know, after looking that up and reading very carefully, it turns out you're right! This also means I (and most of the gamers I've talked to) misunderstood the Battle Master's Improved Critical feature somewhat. With that in mind, though, I don't think I'll be editing the Luck Seven feature (without some playtesting, at least), as it's currently very consistent with Improved Critical.

      I might do some math on this to be sure, but it's possible that the Lucky Seven feature will be pretty underpowered without the automatic hit, since a roll of 7 is significantly less likely to hit than a 19, meaning that this attack will deal critical damage far less often. I'll do an edit once I figure it out.

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    5. Let's d20=7+ 6( proficiency) + 4 (dex) = 17

      I think that's pretty good as is when you think about it. Only thing you won't be hitting with your crit is full plate.

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    6. Actually I'm wrong according to sage advice a crit is a crit.

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  3. This archetype is really cool. I was wondering how a luck based rogue would work, and I really like the result! Nicely done!

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  4. This archetype is really cool. I was wondering how a luck based rogue would work, and I really like the result! Nicely done!

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  5. I love the class as a whole, but it's missing the 13th lvl archetype feature. Intentionally left out? Getting one trick from your 3rd lvl ability seems lacking, especially when you also get the lvl 17 capstone and a trick?

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    1. Hi Kahz, I'm glad you like it. In response to your queries I think there's a few things you may be misreading. To begin with you do gain more than one trick at 3rd level:

      "At 3rd level, you gain two Tricks of your choice for which you meet the perquisites."

      In addition to this you gain the 'Lucky Save' feature and the bonus proficiencies, all in all I think it works out pretty generous for 3rd level.

      Secondly, you do gain a feature at 13th level. Other than the 9th level 'Fate's Fortune' feature which we decided to give for free, all features in the archetype are tricks, you gain two at 3rd level and then:

      "You learn an additional Trick at 9th level, 13th level, and 17th level."

      The additional options available at these levels are intended to be as balanced as a standard 9th, 13th or 17th level feature.

      Finally, I'm not sure what you mean by "you also get the lvl 17 capstone and a trick". You only receive one extra feature at 17th level and that is one new trick for which you meet the prerequisites as mentioned above.

      Hope this clarifies things, if you think we may have not explained this clearly enough let us know where the issue lies and we can review the text.

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    2. Ah yes I see where I've misread with the later abilities. I understand the 2 tricks at 3rd level, it's a similar progression to the elemental monk in that regard, along with the additional trick that's select-able later at 13th and 17th. However, you've given the tricks available at 9th with an additional ability, and that breaks the progressional aspect, so you get a 3rd/9th, but no 13th/17th. I misread the last listed trick and interpreted it as a capstone ability, the problems of reading when not 100% awake, my apologies.

      I do like it (and the tricks), but some of these tricks really under-perform in their areas, whilst others are amazing at over-performing, the balance between the tricks themselves is off. For complete RP/fluff/flavor purposes, it's a beautiful class. But in a mechanical aspect, some of these have what I see as relatively pointless mechanics, that get rendered a moot point based on the rogues core abilities (especially contested checks when you consider reliable talent and expertise, such as 'Cheaters Sometimes Prosper'), or are placed so highly on the level unlock for abilities that some races get automatically (half orc and When The Chips Are Down, for instance, despite the move speed buff, which doesn't seem warranted enough to push it from lvl 1 - lvl 17).
      I also admit to having a personal dislike to abilities themselves that punish a player for using them in general, since 5e has for the greatest part led itself away from the +/- mechanics of old editions, so that perhaps colors me a bit here.

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  6. This class is excellent in concept and in execution. I did make one major change to the When The Chips Are Down trick, for my own games' use.

    "When you are reduced to 0 hit points but not killed outright, you can roll a d8 and call it. If your guess is correct, you gain half of your max HP (rounded down). You may also, as a Reaction, move up to twice your speed without provoking opportunity attacks."

    In other words, I turned it into an actual gamble with a desirable benefit, which can be used any time it applies, but with a low enough rate of success to make it not overpowered. I'm still unsure on using a d8 over a d6 though, since it's such a high level ability and those should feel powerful. What do you think?

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